Raw Carnage: Continuity

I celebrate 2 months now – 2 months since food was cooked or caramelized above 115C.
Remember how I explained that falling off the wagon from time to time happens? Well, let me share a small story with you: falling off the wagon at La Quercia was a toughy. Not only has starch of the “handmade pasta” magnitude been removed from life, adding it back in for a one-night-only celebrity shift was as decadent as it was painful. After 4 courses including gnocchi, lasagne, pappardelle, and risotto, I felt stoned. I thought the lights were flickering on and off, it was really really really hot and clammy, and I was seriously fucked up. The masochistic part about all of this: La Quercia is worth going into a food coma for – lethargic, weak, distended, mental madness, cold sweats – I will remind those reading this – these are the symptoms that occur in Lauren’s body since eating raw, and in no way reflect the feelings of complete and utter gluttonous satisfaction achieved whilst eating 10 courses at La Quercia a year prior.

So where do I find myself now – it’s now become super easy to be creative. Although it was challenging as I have conveyed in my previous story to develop recipes that are raw, interesting and mostly meatless, I don’t find that’s the case anymore. It should be noted that incorporating some of the raw practices will still make you feel better comparatively so who cares if here and there something’s cooked. Sometime it’s not worth going hungry just because you cannot figure out how to dehydrate your falafel balls. So here are some cool recipes that I have developed in the past 2 months worthy of sharing:

Burrito filling:

pulse in food processor:
shallot
garlic
canned tomatoes
basil

crush in mortar and pestle:
coriander
cumin
salt
pepper
red chili flakes

pulse in food processor until crumbly:
almonds
cashews
hemp seeds
pumpkin seeds
sunflower seeds

chop by hand into small cubes:
medium tofu

pulse in food processor until resembles “rice”
cauliflower

Soak navy beans over night in cold water, drain and set aside.

In the end, combine all the ingredients together carefully in a bowl, and mix (plus olive oil).
Keep textures vivid. Keep flavours bold. Adjust where you need to. Eat with organic corn tortillas, or in butter lettuce wraps.

Remember to season everything individually, and I am purposely not giving amounts: feel it out.

Falafel:

Pulse in food processor:
almonds
cashews
black and white sesame seeds

Pulse in food processor:
chick peas
tahini
lemon juice
olive oil

crush in mortar and pestle:
coriander
cumin
salt
pepper
red chili flakes

chop:
parsley
mint
basil

slosh dressing:
Plain or fruit yogurt
garlic
cumin
lemon juice
salt
pepper
coriander
chopped cucumber

Season everywhere. In the end, combine all the ingredients together carefully in a bowl, and mix (plus one egg).
This is where people would use a dehydrator, but to be honest I am not that set on it yet – maybe in 3 months. In the meantime, you can “cook” the falafel gently over medium heat, or in the oven doing the same.
Keep textures vivid. Keep flavours bold. Adjust where you need to. Eat with organic pita, or on a salad.

You’ll notice that there is some repetition in the base “pate” for these recipes. Find the combinations of flavours, textures, and ingredients that work for you, and change the consistancy, applications, and spices in order to accommodate interesting new dishes. Mine seems to work well as a seed and nut pate as listed above.

My go-to “pate”

cashews
almonds
sesame (black and white)
poppy seeds
hemp seeds
walnuts (occasionally)
salt
pepper
tahini
tofu (optional)

My go-to “soup base”

tomatoes
veg stock + water
coconut milk + coconut cream
fresh chilis
fresh limes
salt
pepper

My go-to “sweet base” (used for fruit bars on their own, tart bases, or topping for yogurt)
prunes
mission figs
dried apricots
dates
unsulphured coconut
vanilla bean

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About Lauren Mote

Lauren has been an intricate part of the food industry for many years. Whether it’s behind the bar, in the kitchen, tasting and learning about wine, or sitting with her laptop writing food stories and reviews at the local coffee house, it was clear at an early age that Lauren’s professional and personal life would be completely consumed by the joy and passion of edibles.
This entry was posted in Default Category - No Reason., recipes and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Raw Carnage: Continuity

  1. Jessica G says:

    Nice work Lauren! Sounds delicious and healthy!

  2. Rebecca says:

    Question: Are canned tomatoes and tortillas ‘cooked’/above 115°? I have been trying to Google such info to no avail.

    • Lauren Mote says:

      if they are, these are things that i am ok with adding in once in a while…. i think, like i have been saying all along, following a diet verbatim is where general problems in eating occur. i would rather do the best that i can on a daily basis. i have made a very important discovery though – coconut milk consumed everyday makes you fat lol

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